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Wine can be a marvellous partner with food.  This is often presented as complex subject but, in reality, it can be simple if you think about personal preference and common interactions between food and wine.

Food and Wine Pairing can be simple

Personal Preference

When recommending a wine to a customer or a friend, the most important thing you should consider is what that person likes or dislikes.  You may find a particular food and wine pairing to be exceptional.  However, if someone asking for advice does not like that style of wine, then there is no point recommending ding it to them.

Food and Wine Interactions

For most people, most wines will be an acceptable accompaniment with most foods.  However, there are a number of food characteristics that will typically have a positive or a negative effect on a wine.

If you are able to understand these interactions then you will never be limited to recommending a particular wine with a particular dish.  So long as you know what most people would typically want to avoid, then your options for food and wine pairing become almost limitlesss.

Wine Folly -Food and Wine Pairing Basics.

Your options for food and wine pairings can be limitless

Food is…                                          

Sweet wine can seem more drying and bitter, more acidic less sweet and fruity.                                                   

Unami wine can seem more drying and bitter, more acidic less sweet and fruity.

Salty wine can be less drying and bitter, less acidic more fruity, more body.                                             

Acidic wine can be less drying and bitter, less acidic more sweet and fruity.

Highly Flavoured wine can be overwhelmed by the food flavours.

Fatty/oily wine can be less acidic.                                          

Hot (chilli) Wine seems to increase the heat from the chilli, alcohol in the wine seems more noticeable.

If you understand food and wine interactions then you will never be limited to recommending a particular wine with a particular dish.

Note:  Bitterness in wine can come from tannins or oak    

Well phew thats my fourth and final write up of the WSET Level 1 Award in Wines which I sat and passed at Leiths school of food and wine in central London.  I think I may need a break from wine before I venture into the Level 2 course.  If you have any wine stories to share with SurreyK then please get in touch via our contact page.

Emma xxx